Knee/Lower Leg







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knee lower leg
Knee and lower leg pain treatments offered at Physio Logic include:

 

  1. Arthritis

    Arthritis is a general term meaning “joint inflammation”. The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis (OA). There are several causes for OA, such as a trauma as a child or young, adult, postural imbalance, repetitive stress, and heavy manual labor to name a few. Physio Logic is successful at treating this condition with numerous conservative treatment options.

  2. Joint Pain Dysfunction

    Joint pain is discomfort that arises from any joint — the point where two or more bones meet. Joint pain is sometimes called arthritis or arthralgia. Joint pain can be mild, causing some soreness each time you move your joint. Or joint pain can be severe, making it impossible to use your joint.

  3. Ligament Sprain and Tear

    A sprain is a stretching or tearing of ligaments — the tough bands of fibrous tissue that connect two bones together in your joints.

  4. Muscle Strain

    A strain is a stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon. A tendon is a fibrous cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones.

  5. Nerve Entrapment

    Nerve entrapment is the repeated and long-term nerve compression in nerves near joints that are affected by inflammation or swelling. Symptoms may be discomfort and weakness, and sensations of numbness, tingling or burning.

  6. Runners Knee

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a broad term used to describe pain in the front of the knee and around the patella, or kneecap. It is sometimes called “runner’s knee” or “jumper’s knee” because it is common in people who participate in sports—particularly females and young adults—but patellofemoral pain syndrome can occur in nonathletes, as well. The pain and stiffness it causes can make it difficult to climb stairs, kneel down, and perform other everyday activities.

    Many things may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Problems with the alignment of the kneecap and overuse from vigorous athletics or training are often significant factors. The most common symptom of patellofemoral pain syndrome is a dull, aching pain in the front of the knee. This pain—which usually begins gradually and is frequently activity-related—may be present in one or both knees. Other common symptoms include:

    Pain during exercise and activities that repeatedly bend the knee, such as climbing stairs, running, jumping, or squatting.
    Pain after sitting for a long period of time with your knees bent, such as one does in a movie theater or when riding on an airplane.
    Pain related to a change in activity level or intensity, playing surface, or equipment.
    Popping or crackling sounds in your knee when climbing stairs or when standing up after prolonged sitting.

  7. Shin Splints

    The term “shin splints” refers to pain along the shinbone (tibia) — the large bone in the front of your lower leg. Shin splints are common in runners, dancers and military recruits.

    Medically known as medial tibial stress syndrome, shin splints often occur in athletes who have recently intensified or changed their training routines. The muscles, tendons and bone tissue become overworked by the increased activity.

    Most cases of shin splints can be treated with rest, ice and other self-care measures. Wearing proper footwear and modifying your exercise routine can help prevent shin splints from recurring.

  8. Tendinitis

    Tendinitis is inflammation or irritation of a tendon — any one of the thick fibrous cords that attaches muscle to bone. The condition causes pain and tenderness just outside a joint.

  9. Meniscal Tear

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury. The meniscus is a rubbery, C-shaped disc that cushions your knee. Each knee has two menisci (plural of meniscus)—one at the outer edge of the knee and one at the inner edge. The menisci keep your knee steady by balancing your weight across the knee. A torn meniscus can prevent your knee from working right.

    A meniscus tear is usually caused by twisting or turning quickly, often with the foot planted while the knee is bent. Meniscus tears can occur when you lift something heavy or play sports. As you get older, your meniscus gets worn. This can make it tear more easily.

    There are three types of meniscus tears. Each has its own set of symptoms.

    With a minor tear, you may have slight pain and swelling. This usually goes away in 2 or 3 weeks.

    A moderate tear can cause pain at the side or center of your knee. Swelling slowly gets worse over 2 or 3 days. This may make your knee feel stiff and limit how you can bend your knee, but walking is usually possible. You might feel a sharp pain when you twist your knee or squat. These symptoms may go away in 1 or 2 weeks but can come back if you twist or overuse your knee. The pain may come and go for years if the tear isn’t treated.

    In severe tears, pieces of the torn meniscus can move into the joint space. This can make your knee catch, pop, or lock. You may not be able to straighten it. Your knee may feel “wobbly” or give way without warning. It may swell and become stiff right after the injury or within 2 or 3 days.

    If you are older and your meniscus is worn, you may not know what you did to cause the tear. You may only remember feeling pain after you got up from a squatting position, for example. Pain and slight swelling are often the only symptoms.

  10. Artificial Knee Joint Replacement Rehab
  11. Fractures
  12. Pre and Post Surgical Rehab