Elbow/Forearm







Questions or Concerns?

elbow forearm
Pain in the elbow or forearm can be caused by a number of conditions. The specialists at Physio Logic are experts in the treatment of the following:

  1. Cubital and Radial Tunnel Syndrome

    The common cause of all these nerve compression syndromes is increased pressure — usually from bone or connective tissue — on a nerve in the wrist, arm, or elbow. They also can cause severe pain, numbness, tingling, and muscle weakness in the hands and arms. Cubital tunnel syndrome — also known as ulnar neuropathy — is caused by increased pressure on the ulnar nerve, which passes close to the skin’s surface in the area of the elbow commonly known as the “funny bone.” Radial tunnel syndrome is caused by increased pressure on the radial nerve, which runs by the bones and muscles of the forearm and elbow. Symptoms of radial tunnel syndrome include: Cutting, piercing, or stabbing pain at the top of the forearm or back of the hand, especially when you try to straighten your wrist and fingers. In contrast to cubital tunnel syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome rarely causes numbness or tingling, because the radial nerve principally affects the muscles.

  2. Golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis)

    Golfer’s elbow is an injury to the muscles that flex your wrist and fingers. The site of injury is typically the medial epicondyle, a bony bump on the inside of the elbow where these muscles attach

    Typically the golfer’s elbow sufferer will experience pain when performing gripping tasks or resisted wrist/finger flexion. Pain can also be present when the muscles are stretched. There will be tenderness directly over the bony epicondyle, and there may be trigger points in the wrist flexor muscles.

    Some sufferers will also have neck stiffness and tenderness, as well as signs of median nerve irritation. Most elbow movements will be pain-free. Gripping is painful.

    Golfer’s elbow is caused by damaged muscle tissue at the point it anchors to the arm bone at the elbow. It occurs when more force is applied to an area than the normal healthy tissues can handle.

  3. Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis)

    Acute Tennis Elbow is an injury to the muscles that extend the wrist and fingers. The site of injury is typically the lateral epicondyle, a bony bump on the outside of the elbow where these muscles attach.

    Tennis Elbow symptoms that have lasted more than 6 weeks are considered to be sub-acute and beyond three months, as chronic tennis elbow.

    Typically the Tennis Elbow sufferer will experience pain when performing gripping tasks or resisted wrist/finger extension. Pain can also be present when the muscles are stretched. There will be tenderness directly over the bony epicondyle, and there may be trigger points in the wrist muscles.

    Some sufferers will also have neck stiffness and tenderness, as well as signs of nerve irritation. Most elbow movements will be pain-free, despite that being the area of pain.

    Acute Tennis Elbow is caused by damaged muscle tissue at the point it anchors to the arm bone at the elbow. It occurs when more force is applied to an area than the normal healthy tissues can handle.

    Some activities that may cause Tennis Elbow include: unaccustomed hand use. eg painting a fence, hammering, lots of typing; excessive gripping or wringing activities; poor forearm muscle strength or tight muscles; poor technique (this may be a poor tennis shot).

    In some cases such as Chronic Tennis Elbow, this can occur due to the soft tissues being in poor health, which are easily injured. Inflammation follows the injury, which leads to swelling and elbow pain.

    Chronic Tennis Elbow is associated with degenerative changes in the muscle tissues located at the epicondyle. Although for a long time this was thought to be related to inflammation from overuse, this is now known to be incorrect.

  4. Arthritis

    Arthritis is a general term meaning “joint inflammation”. The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis (OA). There are several causes for OA, such as a trauma as a child or young, adult, postural imbalance, repetitive stress, and heavy manual labor to name a few. Physio Logic is successful at treating this condition with numerous conservative treatment options.

  5. Bursitis

    Bursitis is the inflammation or irritation of the bursa. The bursa is a sac filled with lubricating fluid, located between tissues such as bone, muscle, tendons and skin, that decreases rubbing, friction, and irritation. Bursitis is most often caused by repetitive, minor impact on the area, or from a sudden, more serious injury. Age also plays a role. As tendons age they are able to tolerate stress less, are less elastic, and are easier to tear. Overuse or injury to the joint at work or play can also increase a person’s risk of bursitis. Incorrect posture at work or home and poor stretching or conditioning before exercise can also lead to bursitis.

  6. Joint Pain Dysfunction

    Joint pain is discomfort that arises from any joint — the point where two or more bones meet. Joint pain is sometimes called arthritis or arthralgia. Joint pain can be mild, causing some soreness each time you move your joint. Or joint pain can be severe, making it impossible to use your joint.

  7. Ligament Sprain

    A sprain is a stretching or tearing of ligaments — the tough bands of fibrous tissue that connect two bones together in your joints.

  8. Muscle Sprain

    A strain is a stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon. A tendon is a fibrous cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones.

  9. Tendinitis

    Tendinitis is inflammation or irritation of a tendon — any one of the thick fibrous cords that attaches muscle to bone. The condition causes pain and tenderness just outside a joint.

  10. Fractures
  11. Pre & Post Surgical Rehab
  12. Artificial Joint Replacement Rehab