Shoulder/Arm







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Get relief from shoulder and arm pain at Physio Logic.
The rehabilitation specialists at Physio Logic are fully trained and certified to treat shoulders and arm pain. Here are some of the conditions we treat:

  1. Arthritis

    Arthritis is a general term meaning “joint inflammation”. The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis (OA). There are several causes for OA, such as a trauma as a child or young, adult, postural imbalance, repetitive stress, and heavy manual labor to name a few. Physio Logic is successful at treating this condition with numerous conservative treatment options.

  2. Bursitis

    Bursitis is the inflammation or irritation of the bursa. The bursa is a sac filled with lubricating fluid, located between tissues such as bone, muscle, tendons and skin, that decreases rubbing, friction, and irritation. Bursitis is most often caused by repetitive, minor impact on the area, or from a sudden, more serious injury. Age also plays a role. As tendons age they are able to tolerate stress less, are less elastic, and are easier to tear. Overuse or injury to the joint at work or play can also increase a person’s risk of bursitis. Incorrect posture at work or home and poor stretching or conditioning before exercise can also lead to bursitis.

  3. Frozen Shoulder

    Frozen shoulder, also called adhesive capsulitis, causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder. Over time, the shoulder becomes very hard to move. Frozen shoulder occurs in about 2% of the general population. It most commonly affects people between the ages of 40 and 60, and occurs in women more often than men. In frozen shoulder, the shoulder capsule thickens and becomes tight. Stiff bands of tissue — called adhesions — develop. In many cases, there is less synovial fluid in the joint. The hallmark sign of this condition is being unable to move your shoulder – either on your own or with the help of someone else. The causes of frozen shoulder are not fully understood. There is no clear connection to arm dominance or occupation. A few factors may put you more at risk for developing frozen shoulder including diabetes, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, Parkinson’s disease, cardiac disease, and immobilization for a period of time due to a fracture, surgery or other injury.

  4. Impingement Syndrome

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain. It occurs when there is impingement of tendons or bursa in the shoulder from bones of the shoulder. Overhead activity of the shoulder, especially repeated activity, is a risk factor for shoulder impingement syndrome. Examples include: painting, lifting, swimming, tennis, and other overhead sports. Other risk factors include bone and joint abnormalities. With impingement syndrome, pain is persistent and affects everyday activities. Motions such as reaching up behind the back or reaching up overhead to put on a coat or blouse, for example, may cause pain. Over time, impingement syndrome can lead to inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons (tendinitis) and bursa (bursitis). If not treated appropriately, the rotator cuff tendons can start to thin and tear.

  5. Shoulder instability

    Shoulder instability means that the shoulder joint is too loose and is able to slide around too much in the socket. In some cases, the unstable shoulder actually slips out of the socket. If the shoulder slips completely out of the socket, it has become dislocated. If not treated, instability can lead to arthritis of the shoulder joint.

  6. Joint Pain Dysfunction

    Joint pain is discomfort that arises from any joint — the point where two or more bones meet. Joint pain is sometimes called arthritis or arthralgia. Joint pain can be mild, causing some soreness each time you move your joint. Or joint pain can be severe, making it impossible to use your joint.

  7. Ligament Sprain

    A sprain is a stretching or tearing of ligaments — the tough bands of fibrous tissue that connect two bones together in your joints.

  8. Muscle Strain

    A strain is a stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon. A tendon is a fibrous cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones.

  9. Nerve Entrapment

    Nerve entrapment is the repeated and long-term nerve compression in nerves near joints that are affected by inflammation or swelling. Symptoms may be discomfort and weakness, and sensations of numbness, tingling or burning.

  10. Tendinitis

    Tendinitis is inflammation or irritation of a tendon — any one of the thick fibrous cords that attaches muscle to bone. The condition causes pain and tenderness just outside a joint.

  11. Thoracic outlet syndrome

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a condition whereby symptoms are produced from compression of nerves or blood vessels, or both, because of an inadequate passageway through an area (thoracic outlet) between the base of the neck and the armpit. Thoracic outlet syndrome symptoms include neck pain, shoulder pain, arm pain, numbness and tingling of the fingers, and/or impaired circulation to the extremities. Diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome is by the symptoms and physical findings and is sometimes supported by electrical and/or radiology tests.

  12. Thoracic outlet syndrome

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a condition whereby symptoms are produced from compression of nerves or blood vessels, or both, because of an inadequate passageway through an area (thoracic outlet) between the base of the neck and the armpit. Thoracic outlet syndrome symptoms include neck pain, shoulder pain, arm pain, numbness and tingling of the fingers, and/or impaired circulation to the extremities. Diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome is by the symptoms and physical findings and is sometimes supported by electrical and/or radiology tests.

  13. Rotator Cuff Tear/Injuries

    The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles that help move and stabilize the shoulder joint: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor. Damage to any or all of the four muscles and the ligaments that attach these muscles to bone can occur because of acute injury, chronic overuse, or gradual aging. This damage can cause significant pain and disability with range of motion and use of the shoulder joint.

    The shoulder is a ball-socket joint that allows the arm to move in many directions. It is made up of the humeral head (the upper end of the bone of the upper arm) fitting into the glenoid fossa of the scapula (shoulder blade). The humeral head is kept in place by the joint capsule and labrum, thick bands of cartilage that form an elongated cone where the humeral head fits. The rotator cuff muscles are the dynamic stabilizers and movers of the shoulder joint and adjust the position of the humeral head and scapula during shoulder movement. Other muscles that help move and stabilize the shoulder include the deltoid, teres major, coracobrachialis, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis major.

    When the rotator cuff is damaged, a variety of issues arise: Pain and spasm limit the range of motion of the shoulder; the muscles do not make the small adjustments within the joint to allow the humeral head to move smoothly; fluid accumulation within the joint due to inflammation limits movement; Arthritis and calcium deposits that form over time limit range of motion.

    The severity of injury may range from a mild strain and inflammation of the muscle or tendon, that will lead to no permanent damage, to a partial or complete tear of the muscle that might require surgery for repair.

  14. Pre & Post Surgical Rehab
  15. Fractures